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03

Dec

In writing. Don’t use adjectives which merely tell us how you want us to feel about the thing you are describing. I mean, instead of telling us a thing was ‘terrible,’ describe it so that we’ll be terrified. Don’t say it was ‘delightful’; make us say ‘delightful’ when we’ve read the description. You see, all those words (horrifying, wonderful, hideous, exquisite) are only like saying to your readers, ‘Please will you do my job for me.’
C. S. Lewis (via wordpainting)
Saturday night is perfect for writers because other people have “plans.”
Mike Birbiglia, Comedian (via othertalesoflogan)

01

Dec

At the moment that we persuade a child, any child, to cross that threshold, that magic threshold into a library, we change their lives forever, for the better.
Barack Obama (via thelifeguardlibrarian)

(Source: listlva.lib.va.us)

jordantypefont:

This is so clever.  Or maybe it’s just the English major in me that gets it.

jordantypefont:

This is so clever.  Or maybe it’s just the English major in me that gets it.

(Source: topsyturvy-tea)

Actual happiness always looks pretty squalid in comparison with the overcompensations for misery. And, of course, stability isn’t nearly so spectacular as instability. And being contented has none of the glamour of a good fight against misfortune, none of the picturesqueness of a struggle with temptation, or a fatal overthrow by passion or doubt. Happiness is never grand.
Aldous Huxley, Brave New World (via leritas)

30

Nov

…because nothing is as good as you can imagine it. No one is as beautiful as she is in your head. Nothing is as exciting as your fantasy.
Choke, Chuck Palahniuk (via honeysucculents)

(Source: liquidnight)

other-wordly:

pronunciation | ‘brUm-us (BROOM-us)

other-wordly:

pronunciation | ‘brUm-us (BROOM-us)

Night waned upon this talk, and even the witching hour had gone by before we retired to rest. When I placed my head on my pillow, I did not sleep, nor could I be said to think. My imagination, unbidden, possessed and guided me, gifting the successive images that arose in my mind with a vividness far beyond the usual bound of reverie. I saw - with shut eyes, but acute mental vision - I saw the pale student of unhallowed arts kneeling beside the thing he had put together; I saw the hideous phantasm of a man stretched out; and then, on the working of some powerful engine, show signs of life, and stir with an uneasy, half-vital motion…

[…]

I certainly did not owe the suggestion of one incident, nor scarcely of one train of feeling.

29

Nov

In which John Green recommends some of his favorite books to some of his favorite people (Crash Course fans, Whovians, Sherlockians, Harry Potter fans, Swoodilypooper supporters, and nerdy readers of all kinds). Recommended books include:

  • The Ballad of the Whiskey Robber by Julian Rubinstein
  • Behind the Beautiful Forevers by Katherine Boo
  • Sula by Toni Morrison
  • Mansfield Park and Persuasion by Jane Austen
  • The Blood of the Lamb by Peter de Vries
  • Uglies by Scott Westerfeld
  • Matched by Ally Condie
  • Divergent by Veronica Roth
  • Telegraph Avenue by Michael Chabon
  • Bossypants by Tina Fey
  • The Magicians by Lev Grossman
  • Harry, a History by Melissa Anelli
  • The Art of Fielding by Chad Harbach
  • The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
  • Wolf Hall by Hilary Mantel
  • The Astonishing Life of Octavian Nothing, Traitor to the Nation by M. T. Anderson
  • The Emperor of All Maladies by Siddhartha Mukherjee
  • The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks by E. Lockhart
  • Everybody Sees the Ants by A. S. King
  • If I Stay by Gayle Foreman
  • To Say Nothing of the Dog by Connie Willis
  • The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle

(Source: livingthepookielife)

Q. When writing TFIOS, were you more focused on telling the story at first or the metaphorical meaning and the symbols in the book?
A. I don’t think of story and symbols as separate, really. They emerge from the same place, a desire to go on a journey with the reader that will be interesting (and hopefully helpful) to both of us. So I don’t sit down and say, like, “Green will be the color of all the dreams we were foolish to dream,” or anything like that, because then I think it usually ends up seeming clunky and obvious and inauthentic.
The truth is that metaphor and symbol are all around us, and that we are constantly reading our lives and the world symbolically. I want figurative language and symbols to be as deeply integrated into the story as they are into our lives.

Okay I want to post all of these John Green TFioS Q&As but you should just read them here.

I think this is a helpful observation about symbolism.

(via yeahwriters)